Intro to the Internet and WWW

CMPT 165, Fall 2019

Greg Baker

https://coursys.sfu.ca/2019fa-cmpt-165-d1/pages/

This Course

Introduction to the Internet and the World Wide Web

Course web site: in CourSys, https://coursys.sfu.ca/ . You'll find all of the course materials (including these slides) there.

This Course

Instructor: Greg Baker <ggbaker@sfu.ca>.

Office hours in TASC1 9229:

  • Tuesday 11:00–12:00
  • Friday 10:30–12:20

This Course

TAs: Anurag Bejju and Pourya Vaziri.

Office hours: TBA.

Email cmpt-165-d1-help@sfu.ca for help, not Greg or the TAs directly.

Topics

The course is an overview of the technologies behind the WWW. Major topics we'll cover:

  • Markup and HTML
  • CSS stylesheets
  • JavaScript programming
  • Web Graphics

Materials

References:

  • Course Study Guide: free online.
  • Online references to HTML, CSS, JavaScript.
  • Other books/sites will be suggested as we go on, if you want another explanation.

Materials

The Study Guide will be the primary reference.

It was written for online offerings, so it's a fairly complete coverage of the course material. I may diverge a little.

Materials

Computers:

  • Any computer you have will do.
  • You can access the Computing Science Instructional Labs (CSIL) in ASB.

Software you need is all free: see Study Guide for links.

Grades

Things you will do to get grades…

Weekly Exercises: 12 × 1% = 12%. They are due every Friday (starting week 2). Designed to be short and exercise fundamental ideas.

Grades

Assignments: 4 × 4.5% = 18%.

These are longer and intended to integrate the ideas from the lectures/​exercises.

Grades

Midterm Exam: 20%. In lecture time, October 23.

Final Exam: 50%. As scheduled (December 4, 3:30–6:30). Cumulative.

For both exams, you are allowed a one page (8.5×11″), single sided, hand-written cheat sheet.

Grades

All together:

  • Exercises: 12 × 1% = 12%.
  • Assignments: 4 × 4.5% = 18%.
  • Midterm Exam: 20%.
  • Final Exam: 50%.

Expectations

To get credit for this course, I expect you to demonstrate that you know the basic ideas of the course. That means passing both the assignments (where you apply the concepts) and exams (where we can see you). Failing either may result in failing the course.

Expectations

Your work should be your own: exercises and assignments are not group work, should not based on somebody else's “template”, work a tutor did for you, etc.

If you work with somebody else, we shouldn't be able to tell from the results.

Academic dishonesty cases will be dealt with according to University policy.